Gut Microbes and Mental Health!

By Kayla White, M.A. Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Resident in Counseling

Photo by Brandless on Unsplash

It’s no secret that mental health and the gut-brain membrane is a new, flourishing research area! One study found that Coprococcus seems to have a pathway related to dopamine, a key brain signal involved in depression, although they have no evidence how this might protect against depression. The same microbe also makes an anti-inflammatory substance called butyrate, and increased inflammation is implicated in depression. Linking the absence of the bacteria to depression โ€œmakes sense physiologically,โ€ says Sara Campbell, a physiologist at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

SO! What can we do?

Educate clients, if they are interested in the topic, about the brain-gut membrane. Introducing clients to the idea of using pre and probiotics into their daily routine! Some examples of probiotics are kimchi, yogurt, kefir, and miso! Encourage clients to purchase items that have *live* microorganisms and to see if these improve their overall daily thoughts/feelings!

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About Kayla White:

Kayla is a graduate from the University of Virginia, with a B.S. degree in Psychology, and a recent graduate from Marymount University with a M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling.

Many individuals, children and adults, struggle with depression, anxiety, adjusting to change, or simply the desire to understand themselves more thoroughly. Whether to improve mood and functioning, or glean insight into personality, therapy can be reparative, strengthening, and play a role in maximizing enjoyment of life! Kaylaโ€™s expertise is working with children/adolescents, teens, young adults, and adults managing issues of: loneliness, depression, anxiety, behavioral issues, eating disorders, trauma, loss & grief, relationship issues, substance use issues and family conflictTo learn more about Kayla, visit HERE.

Article Reference: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/

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